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has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
johnson if he heard bobby kennedy something critical of president johnson through king. in other words, this was hoover's job was basically to ingratiate himself with johnson to punish bobby kennedy, whom she didn't like and to punish king whenever he could. c-span: by the way, did you listen to the johnson takes? >> guest: yes. that's a whole -- c-span: so you could hear all of those? >> guest: you can hear those. the john thune defeat could johnson tapes were wonderful. they corroborate a lot of what's in a declassified meetings on vietnam and in some of the files, but there's no substitute for actually hearing the tapes. and i quote from a number of them here. c-span: what is the trilogy? >> guest: the trilogy? c-span: money, loyalty, sex. >> guest: money, loyalty -- that became the short hand once bobby -- once dr. king became aware as i said, juneau, a lot of times they thought the thing store being done to them, a hostile things that were being done to them by the police were being done by segregation molest police force, but once they became aware that is the fbi, they had these
dictionaries at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of the street as part of what was part of language. so there was this democratic background. as it goes along there are things that for example jefferson creates which are hysterical. he comes up with twisted vacation which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there are some wonderful things and of course probably on the seedier side and i am relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this but they have popular verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson and one of his diaries. does not appear in any slang dictionary for another 30 years. again i am using the be-all and end-all for there early nailing down when the word was created. austin powers -- you can tell by the way that i have a lot of smart -- the other challenge was looking at how this progress then you can look at your residence and see who really was clever. clever. who was reportedly clever and who is the smartest. along the way there was president johnson first president johnson was the first on
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
, who was really clever and remarkable and who is really smart. president johnson, the first president johnson, he is the first one to come up with discrimination. the first time it was ever used in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiti
at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of of the street as part of what was part of language. so this -- there was this sort of democratic background of this thing. and as it goes along, there are things that, for example, jefferson creates which are hysterical. i mean, he comes up with twistification which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there's some just wonderful things. and, of course b, his -- preble on the seedier side -- probably on the seedier side, and i'm relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this, but the cop la story verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson in one of his diaries. and it does not appear in the any slang dictionary for another 30 years. and this, again, i'm using the be all and end all for sort of early nailing down when a word was created, so austin powers did not create the word "shag," it was thomas jefferson. [laughter] you can tell, by the way, that i have a lot of fun doing this. the other challenge was just looking at how this progressed. you can look at differe
behind and handed it to president johnson and president johnson read it. he didn't show it to bob mcnamara and bob mcnamara called from the library and it has been declassified. he was screaming from the other room why didn't i see this memo? they concluded that it was the six so he didn't see it. and it would not have made a difference if he had seen it. >> the memo concluded the united states position in the world would not be affected if it lost the war. that was a very important point. there were other things in the memo that were not quite right. it was an interesting memo. was really written before they could know what was going on. we could take one more question. >> any advice for the new cia director? >> i do have. i always have an opinion. he should learn to be quiet. if you remember -- i hope you will send the frame back to the pentagon, if you remember, after the osama bin laden capture, he came out of the white house, you remember that? you were probably third. i hope you will be more circumspect. in every part of the agency, he knows it well but i am hoping. my perso
and congresswoman rob andrews. we have congressman johnson on your this well and the prevention tax force or violence. also mike thompson, thank you for your leadership. we are also joined by steny hoyer. with that, we will go to our cochairs. >> i think you very much, madam leader. chairman injuries, to everyone for scheduling this critical and very timely hearing. as the president indicated, there has been assigning of executive orders by the president and we all feel the urgency of responding to the dangers that are communities confront. with the distribution of guns and large capacity magazines and with the status of our mental health observations who ought not to have guns and make sure that we know who is getting weapons and bringing danger to our community. i appreciate the witnesses and i welcome them and it is obviously an extraordinarily timely hearing. the witnesses and the attendance in the media of the public. thank you for being here. thank you, madam leader. >> thank you very much, madam leader. it is a privilege for me to welcome all of you, and i want to say thank you to
? >> caller: this is tim johnson in palm desert. reyna when we speak of hispanic politics or hispanic culture in general, of course, the elephant in the living room is the age-old social and economic status that characterized his spannic culture with the legions of those at the bottom and a few landing patrons at the top. how do you see this playing out in hispanic politics of our day? >> guest: you know, i think that we're living in a point right now here in the country where people with becoming more aware of the latino presence, and the importance steps that latinos are playing right now, especially in politics, you know, the latino vote very important in getting obama re-elected, and now, you know, the event that the republican party, it seems, that they really do need to change their thinking with latinos, and the issue important to us like immigration. i am very excited about, you know, the way the country is looking at latinos and to realize that, you know, we are an important part of the society. we need to work hard to create immigration reform to help those here to definitely move u
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on. i did a report for them. >> what is your history? >> i'm from tennessee. nash fell. my family and their relatives are all still there. i went to a pro high-school. i went to howard university. then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where i got a ph.d. then i went to law s
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
who has worked along side for many years, veronica johnson. veronica is a news person for nbc. there was a time when the news people are more likely not to have the background. she is of a new generation of meteorologists who not only have great credentials but a study of science on an ongoing basis. she is a phenomenal scientist. onhak you. >> this session we really want to get you thinking. let me talk about journalists that we have today. >> okay, that's a pretty good number. we want to get everyone thinking about droughts in this discussion. you think that we can have a mega-drought? we saw how bad 2012 was in areas of the midwest and parts of the country. what about policy? do you think that we are doing enough? and what about the impact of drought on social marginalization? as we go forth, we are going to be taking some kick off questions and you will notice that there are some index cards underneath your chair. if you can periodically throughout the session, right on some of the questions that you have and some will be collecting them we will get those questions answere
of that was contingent on not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king in the stand he took a cozy felt -- we have handed civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host:
and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go into military. >> host: weren't you drafted? >> guest: several times. i tried to be a conscientious objector
. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were different policy choices, different policy options, disagreements. and that if we want to present this crisis, another crisis from happening again i've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head o
in this senate? the contrast is enormous from the time that lyndon b. johnson was president of the senate. lyndon b. johnson for six years presiding over this body saw one filibuster. and harry reid in his six years presiding over this senate has seen 391 filibusters. and let me convey that even when you have the votes to end a filibuster, the fact that it is launched creates enormous paralysis. imagine you're debating a bill and you continue debating through the end of the week and you come in the following monday and you debate and nobody has anything to say and so somebody says, "i ask unanimous consent that we have a final vote on this bill." now, you see, we don't have a previous question, motion on this floor, so one has to ask for unanimous consent. any of a hundred senators can weigh in and say "no." and when they they weigh in and say "no" on that monday, on tuesday, a petition is put forward with 16 senators saying, let's have a vote on closing debate. and that vote can't happen until thursday, under the rules. and if it's successful on a thursday, you have to have 30 hours more of deba
. a briefcase came in from the white house from president johnson full of papers. region have a diplomatic couriers in the. is it you go. we drove to the night. i said the back from one to kept chipping the rest. i get down there in the morning in the one was there except helicopters flying over all of the cows and goats going completely out of the mind. they're running around like crazy, just berserk for fear of the helicopters. the people stand around not knowing what to do it themselves . where is the american ambassador? oprah's he is down the coast. on the beach, and that is where the ambassador was supposed to be. so i said, let's go down there. we went. and just as i got there, just as i got there the ambassador came striding out of the hotel wearing nothing but a bathing suit and a bathing cap. and i tried to stop the ambassador. somehow give him the briefcase. i did not know the combination. it did give me the combination. the head of security was down there. did you relieved me of the briefcase. i said, what's going on. the investor is going to walk into the mediterranean to prov
, and there are two chapters on this. the johnson administration used the fairness doctrine to target some political enemies, one of the people i interviewed in year in addition to a number of us, mark fowler, the reagan chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you have that regulation of the way it allowed people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in. that led to a real explosion of conservative, unleash. >> that was going to be my follow-up question. from 1920 to today, the predominant voices, was there a pattern? left right left? >> interesting enough, one of the things i write about in this book is out during the new deal you have a major metropolitan daily to the right.
9, 2004, when johnson, from ken lawrence frank came out with a book called urban sprawl and public health. but the book did this person technical epidemiological meet on the sociological bones we've been arguing about. here's why cities can save us. by far, the greatest aspect of the epidemic river health challenges is the obesity epidemic. not that obesity itself is the problem, that illnesses the city of these two. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after to test and has a one in three chance in america of becoming a diabetic. now look at the first generation of american going to live shorter lives than their parents. that's not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking about the wonders of the point where they started in the 40-ounce service people are drinking. only recently has the argument -- have cities and then comparing diet and physical inactivity. one was called gluttony versus slot. another doctor at the mayo clinic for patients in electronic underwear and measured every motion chemists at a regime, said it that way, started counti
and harass, the johnson targeted political enemies. one of the people i interview in here, mark faller. reagan's ftc chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you had that regulation out of the way it i allowed people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in and that led to an explosion of consecutive and partisan voices on both sides, mostly on the conservative side. >> host: that was my followup question in regards to from 1920 to today. the predominant-for- -- was there a pattern, left, right, left? >> guest: well, interestingly enough of. one of the things i write about is during the new deal you had the major metropolitan dailies leaping the right. very antifdr, and most of the radio and broadcasting voices were very pro new deal, very pro fdr. kind of have the opposite today. and -- it became sort of a domain for the right, and the late 80s, with rush limbaugh, got his national show in 1988, and then drew from there during the clinton administration, that is one of the best things that happened for talk radio in the sense that it gave lots of material and continued
. trillions of dollars have been spent since president johnson declared war on poverty, and yet the gerald the poverty rate nationwide has remained virtually unchanged at more than 23%. we need a new strategy. we intuitively know that the brookings institute is reported. the best way to combat childhood poverty is three things. the key to the child success is the ability to read. this morning 45,000 kansas children woke up, one dressed and went to kindergarten. a class of two dozen 25 and their the future of kansas. being a will to read is one of the greatest gift that we can give these children, yet 29 percent of kansas' fourth graders didn't work -- can we get a basic level. the goal of the of restoration is to ensure each of the 40,000 kindergartners is able to read professionally by the time they reach the fourth grade. we can do this. we must do this. it is important to our kids. [applause] this is why i am proposing that chances as the initiative with three components, first providing $12 million support to innovative programs to help struggling readers. second, provide incentives to
broadcasting industry and two chapters on this. one is challenging iraq when the johnson administration used the third doctrine to target political enemies. one of the people i interviewed in here, i interviewed mark fowler, reagan's chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you had the regulation out of the way and allow people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in and that led to a real explosion of conservative -- mostly on the conservative side. >> that was my follow-up question in regards from 1920 to today the predominant voices, was there pattern that when left right left? >> interesting enough one of the things i write about in this book is how during the new deal you had a major metropolitan dailies lean to the right. they were very anti fdr and most of the radiobroadcasting voices, talk radio were very pro new deal, kind of the opposite today. mostly became sort of domain for the right and the late 80s with russia limbaugh, his national show in 1988 and the group from there, in the clinton administration, one of the best things that happened for talk-radio, gave l
that money we turned around and spent eight because johnson created the unified budget so we no longer have that fire will. and so all of a sudden now the 02.6 trillion to social security that we are going to have to borrow as social security on linus which is about 2030, the regular social security problem. >> host: matthew posts senator coburn, three questions. one, the social security and other social entrance programs like medicare and medicaid infringe on personal responsibility? number two, cbo reports federal health spending will dominate mandatory spending by the mid 20s 30's. >> host: there's been a lot of psychological and social research on this. if you think somebody else will take care of you, and it's your government saying you will, then you are less likely to plan or prepare for that. and cbo is right my generation will hit 65 in march and there's 3.5 million of us this next year that become eligible for medicare and the next year 3.5 million become eligible for social security. because that was in the tip o'neill and ronald reagan six. that's why the demographics are so imp
submitted and i've written about this a great deal. was a lemon has written about a it, simon johnson the great scholar has written about it and others, that what is happening to your is one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible in recovering from the crisis is because the transition mechanism for monetary policy is found up. think of it as sludge in the motor of your engine. it's hard to get the pistons to move. we provide the fuel, the central bank. it has to be into the economy. we not only have to inducer and sent people to step on the accelerator to create more jobs. that's a matter of having to rip us from our vacations, tax incentives and so on, that has to be transmitted to the banking system. these banks are in such deep trouble in control so much of the assets have been focused on other things. they are interfering the effectiveness for accommodative monetary policy. if you get people to understand this is hurting job creation in the district come he might more political support. i believe this support is gaining ground. it's not just a question of fairne
this a great deal, hunting is written about it, simon johnson, a great scholar has written about it and others, that what has happened is one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible and recovering from the crisis is because the transition mechanism for monetary policy is combed out. think of it as sludge on the motor of your ancient. it's hard to get pistons to move. we provide the fuel to central bank. it has to be transmitted into the economy to me not only have to inducer and sent people to step on the accelerator to create more jobs, that's a matter of having to write laws, regulations, tax incentives and so on, that has to be transmitted through the banking system and the sphinx in such deep trouble in control so much of the asset haven't focused on other things. so they're interfering with the effectiveness of accommodated monetary policy. if you get people to understand this is hurting job creation in the district, think you have more political support. i believe the support is gaining ground. it's not just a question of fairness. it is a question of efficacy and i bel
kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson in 1965. from 1977 jimmy carter and wrap up with george w. bush's speech from 2001. see ten inauguration speeches from ten past presidents. starting at 8:00 p.m. on c-span. requiring congress to act intestified working around the legislative body. speaking at the briefings hosted by the christian science monitor. he said he's hopeful not confident about the perspective for a tax reform. and expressed a willing tons look at the medicare eligibility age in the context of deficit reduction. this is an hour. >> thank you for coming. welcome to our first breakfast of the new year. our guest is sander levin of michigan. this is the first visit with the group. we welcome him. he's a detroit native learned bachelor of degree in chicago. elected michigan state senate. he was assistant administrator to agency for international development. he was elected to the house in 1982. four years after his brother karl elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the gavel as chairman of the means committee. thus ended biographical portion of the
of michigan. [applause] secretary of state luke johnson. [applause] as well as the attorney general of the state of michigan. [applause] all the members of my cabinet. [applause] thank you. i would like to thank all the ladies and gentlemen of the legislature. thank you for your partnership. [applause] i want to thank the citizens of michigan this opportunity. it is an honor to be your governor. [applause] have a special thank you. i would request that every member that is in the military services or armed services we stand. [applause] thank you. [applause] >> they deserve a special thank you. i would like to share a couple moments with you any trip last april. one special thing happened that i would share with you. it was with the 125th infantry in afghanistan, a national guard unit. when i arrived, they asked me to do a ceremony. i had the opportunity to swear people in to reenlist them in the michigan national guard at an operating base in harms way. those are special people. we need to say thank you to anyone serving. to give you some perspective, we had well over 1000 michigand
've written about this great deal, how dan has written about it, rosa has written about, simon johnson the great scholar, and others. that what is happening is the reason, one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible in recovering from the crisis is because the transmission mechanism for monetary policy is dumped out. think of it as sludge on the motor of age. it's very hard to get the pistons to move. we provide the fuel, central bank. it has to be transmitted into the economy. and when i don't have to and sent people to step on the accelerator, to create more jobs, that's a matter of having to write laws, right regulation, right tax incentives and so on. but it has to be transmitted through the banking system. and these banks that were in such deep trouble and controlled so much of the industry's assets have been focused on other things. so they are interfering with the effectiveness as i mentioned in my speech. if you can get people to understand that this is holding back and hurting job creation in our district, then i think you might have a little bit more politic
lyndon johnson's legislative genius to process forward, beat back resistance and over, what seem to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetime we observed enough nontrivial policy change to recognize that the iron grip of static coal forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the effect of regulation of guns and the appropriate balance between individual rights and civic obligations will command sustained and serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists apply to cases, and politicians will fight over the issues. we know that. and in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role providing principle holdings for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health affects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun policy and research, as visited by our colleague him has provided a home for the study, producing nationally recognized research and rec
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)